The Boston Globe, The Miami Herald, the Star Tribune, and The Texas Tribune join Covering Climate Now

Climate change is a local story, and these four regional outlets are helping their audiences understand the scale of the emergency and what can be done about it.

The global media collaboration Covering Climate Now is proud to welcome four outstanding regional journalism outlets in the United States as partners: The Boston Globe, The Miami Herald, Star Tribune (of Minneapolis), and The Texas Tribune.

“Climate change is a global problem but it manifests in local communities, and good journalism is essential to making that plain to the people affected,” said Mark Hertsgaard, the co-founder and executive director of Covering Climate Now. “Making the climate connection to extreme weather, telling stories about the local people and places affected by climate impacts, and interrogating potential solutions are journalism’s civic duty.”

In 2023, CCNow looks forward to seeing great local and regional outlets like our four newest partners tackle the biggest story of our time.

“The climate crisis is global, but the fight must be local, fought in communities across the world. The Boston Globe launched its ‘Into the Red’ climate team last year with that founding principle,” said the Globe’s climate editor, Steve Wilmsen. “But we are stronger and better in league with the armies of journalists at Covering Climate Now.”

“The Miami Herald is pleased to support the collaborative efforts of the Covering Climate Now initiative. As a credible source for news and information in South Florida it is critical that we provide essential reporting and analysis on climate and environment issues, for the public and for decision makers,” said the Herald’s executive editor, Monica Richardson. “The Herald has dedicated resources to environmental journalism because we believe it will have an impact and our collaboration with the initiative furthers our mission.”

“Reporting on the environment has been a centerpiece of the Star Tribune’s coverage of Minnesota, the Great Lakes and the upper Midwest,” said Suki Dardarian, the Star Tribune’s editor. “Readers want more, and we’ve responded by increasing the staff and resources devoted to environment and climate stories. This collaboration with Covering Climate Now will help us deepen and broaden our coverage.”

“As the state that produces, and uses, the most energy, Texas is central to domestic and global debates over the warming of our planet and how humanity should respond,” said Sewell Chan, the Tribune’s editor-in-chief. “In joining Covering Climate Now, The Texas Tribune will be part of a community of newsrooms that are chronicling the climate crisis and explaining the actions policymakers, corporations, communities and ordinary citizens should be taking.”

Organized by journalists, for journalists, CCNow’s 500-plus partners reach a combined audience of more than 2 billion people and include some of the biggest names in news. CCNow helps newsrooms everywhere provide authoritative, engaging coverage of all aspects of the climate story, from the heartbreaking realities to the common-sense solutions.

Please follow these outlets on all social platforms (@BostonGlobe, @MiamiHerald, @StarTribune, and @TexasTribune), check out their journalism, and support their work and commitment to the climate story. Other newsrooms wishing to join CCNow should contact CCNow’s editors: editors@coveringclimatenow.org.